Woodlands Caravan Park

+ what’s nearby

Information

Newton Road

Carnoustie

Angus

DD7 6GR

Tel: 01241 854430

info@woodlandscaravanpark.net

Website

The campsite has managed to maintain a good degree of privacy. This is no mean feat as there is a large development of newly built houses opposite the entrance, a primary school is situated at its east side and a public park is located through a secured gate to its south.

Situated in the local seaside town of Carnoustie, Woodlands Caravan Park is within short walking distance of the local amenities, including; high street stores, restaurants, beach, and the famous Carnoustie Open Championship golf course.

It has been awarding a 4 star by the national tourist board VisitScotland Rating.

Touring vans are welcome and there is a dedicated area for tents.

 

 

Facilities2
Facilities

Tents, Motorhomes & Tourers

  • 43 pitches available, 14 of which are super pitches with an additional 16 designated pitches available for tents.
  • Hard Standing Touring Pitches available
  • Fully Serviced Touring Sites available (electric, water, drainage hook-ups)
  • Laundry room – coin operated industrial washer and dryer, Iron & Ironing Board
  • Toilet/Shower block – free hot water, free showers, free hand soap
  • Disabled toilet & shower facility
  • Heated shower blocks
  • Hairdryers (free)
  • Washing up area with 2 full size fridge freezers, microwave, kettle & toaster
  • Shave Points
  • Gas Sales – Calor Gas
  • Free WiFi
  • Recycling Area
  • Games Room with has a pool table, plasma TV, board games and vending machine.

 

Getting there

Woodlands Campsite is located Carnoustie, about 11 miles north of Dundee, Scotland. From Dundee, take the B559 to the Craigle roundabout. Then take the A92 and stay on this road until you see a sign for the B9128. Take the slip road and turn right onto the B9128. Take a right at the junction to Carlogie Farm Road, the first left onto the A930. Then take the 4th left onto Newton Road. The campsite is on the left-hand side about 200 yards further on. You might think that you have taken the wrong turn, as it feels like you are entering a housing estate.

If you are coming from the other direction. Arbroath is about 7 miles away and is slightly more straight forward. From Arbroath, take the A92 until use see the sign for the B9128. Take the slip road and turn left onto the B9128. Directions are now as about. Take a right at the junction to Carlogie Farm Road, the first left onto the A930. Then take the 4th left onto Newton Road. The campsite is on the left-hand side about 200 yards further on. You might think that you have taken the wrong turn, as it feels like you are entering a housing estate.

 

signpost3
What's nearby

Carnoustie. The town grew rapidly due to the growth of the local textile industry and is best known for the Carnoustie Golf Links course that often hosts the Open Championship. It is a 5-minute walk, from the campsite, to the town centre. What does Carnoustie have to offer?

  • Carnoustie Golf Links. Carnoustie is world famous for its golf and the Open Championship course has been hosted here 8 times, at time of writing.
  • Barry Mill is a working Category A listed watermill in Barry, Angus in eastern Scotland. It is owned and operated by the National Trust for Scotland as an educational tourist attraction.Wikipedia
  • Carnoustie Beach There is a choice of car parks close by, and a leisure centre and children’s play area with a paddling pool.

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East Haven Is about 2.7 miles from the campsite and is one of the oldest recorded fishing communities in Scotland. The sand and stone beach is popular with locals and visitors with its interesting history and rock pools to explore when the tide is out.

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Broughty Castle Museum is about 8 miles down the coast, in the direction of Dundee. It is a 15th century coastal fort, which houses a fascinating museum.

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8 miles from the campsite is Arbroath Abbey. Situated in the town of Arbroath and dating back to 1178, has played a major roll in Scottish history and is a must visit.

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Arbroath and Motrose are two historic towns that are worth a visit in their own right but for us, it was Lunan Bay we wanted to visit. In fact, the Vikings also wanted to visit, way back in the 10th century and today remains a secluded haven on the dramatic coastline. With its beautiful sand dunes and low cliffs, it extends for two miles and on that particular day that we were there, we had the whole beach to ourselves. It’s not just amazing natural scenery though, there is also the crumbling ruin of Red Castle which overlooks the Bay and dates from the 12th century. The beach can be accessed via the car park and short walk.

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St Cyrus. Is 10 miles further up the coastline from Lunan Bay and is another stunning beach but with a different character. The beach runs for 3 miles, from the village of St Cyrus to the mouth of the North Esk River and is part of St Cyrus national nature reserve. With its striking cliffs and sand dunes as well as the nature reserve, there is a lot of wild life and natural wonders to see. There is car parking, toilets and a visitor centre.

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If you are in a road trip mood, then we would recommend a visit to Dunnottar castle. It is about 45 miles away fro the campsite, so we are stretching it a bit to say it is nearby but it is well worth a visit, if you are able. Our own roadtrip did include this castle, amongst other stops, including – Aberlemno Sculptured Stones and Restenneth Priory. You can read more in the section below – ‘Read about our Trip’

 

 

Read about our trip

Our campsite was within a short walk to the town centre. Woodlands has managed to maintain a good degree of privacy. This is no mean feat as there is a large development of newly built houses opposite the entrance, a primary school is situated at its east side and a public park is located through a secured gate to its south.

It’s perfectly situated for a wander into Carnoustie. So once organized, we were keen to stretch our legs and take a walk into town. We made use of the back gate, which has a security key pad and enables you to walk straight out the campsite and into a local park, known as Carnoustie House Grounds. All adding to the unusual but workable location of this campsite.

The local park is a good size and is well maintained. There is a large grass area and a children’s play park as well as paths stretching around its perimeter.

It wasn’t long before we were in the town centre and with no real particular plan, other than purchasing some provisions, we decided to take a wander around. We arrived at the main street next to the Carnoustie War Memorial and a quick scan was encouraging regards what shops were available. We discovered a Spar and more importantly a Costa. The town was actually bigger that we expected and you will still have a bit of a walk before you reach waterfront, which has the usual tourist feel to it. A further walk, turning right at the waterfront, will take you to Carnoustie Golf Links, a championship course dating back to 1850.

The town clearly has golf to thank for a good majority of its visitors but it existed long before golf arrived and if you look around, you can see glimpses of a town that has other thing to offer and these were highlighted in the ‘What’s nearby’ section, above.

Before arriving, we had already decided to explore by car but there are also lots of walking and cycling options along the Angus coast. That said, it’s not that easy to find a website that gives you all the information you will need. Yes, you can find some specific information from personal blogs etc. but we would recommend Walk Highland

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Our first stop, along the A92, was Lunan Bay. A stunning golden sands beach situated between Arbroath and Montrose.  Two historic towns that are worth a visit in their own right but for us, it was Lunan Bay we wanted to visit. In fact, the Vikings also wanted to visit, way back in the 10th century and today remains a secluded haven on the dramatic coastline.

With its beautiful sand dunes and low cliffs, it extends for two miles and on that particular day that we were there, we had the whole beach to ourselves. It’s not just amazing natural scenery though, there is also the crumbling ruin of Red Castle which overlooks the Bay and dates from the 12th century. The beach can be accessed via the car park and short walk.

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Next up on our tour was St Cyrus. Again, another stunning beach but with a different character and visitor appeal. The beach runs for 3 miles, from the village of St Cyrus to the mouth of the North Esk River and is part of St Cyrus national nature reserve. With its striking cliffs and sand dunes as well as the nature reserve, there is a lot of wildlife and natural wonders to see.

There is car parking, toilets and a visitor centre.

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The A92 would take us to one more destination before we changed direction and joined the A90 and what a destination it was! Dunnottar Castle has got to be one of the most dramatic and awe-inspiring castles. It’s one of those wonders that makes you ask ‘How the hell did they build that?’ Perched on a clifftop and built / extended/altered over the centuries, there are records of a chapel from 1296. With a timescale like that, you won’t be surprised that Dunnotar Castle has a lot of history. The Castle has been attacked by Vikings and William Wallace killed an entire English Garrison inside the Castle with only a handful of men. Kings and queens through history have also been drawn to its magnificence and strategic defense design. This is a must-visit!

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We returned to our car, still amazed by what we had seen, and headed along the A90 until we reached Brechin That’s when we realised that our day had flown in and we didn’t have time to stop as we still had other destinations on our itinerary. So, unfortunately, on this occasion, Brechin was just another one of those picturesque Scottish towns that caught our eye as we drove through.

Soon we turned off the A90 onto the B9134 and made our way to our next stop. The Aberlemno Sculptured Stones four Pictish carvings dating between about AD 500 and 800. One is in the churchyard and the other three are located across the road next to a field. Luckily this is a quiet road but you still need to take care.

The stones are well worth a visit and still retain much detail.  The stone in the churchyard depicts a battle scene which may represent the Battle of Dunnichen in 685AD.

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Our final stop, along the B9134, was Restenneth Priory This building just oozes history. Dating back to at least 710 AD, it played a significant part in history and the lives of people who recognised it’s significance. Robert the Bruce buried his infant son John here in the early 1300s. The annals of Iona, which were important historical documents, were said to have been kept here by Alexander I

This wee road trip had it all. Amazing beaches, a unique nature reserve to stretch your legs and try to get a glimpse of the wildlife, a stunning castle, ancient carved stones and priory that stood proud with so much history.

This part of Scotland is definitely on our return list.

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